US Denies Meeting With Western Diplomats in Libya

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US Denies Meeting With Western Diplomats in Libya
US Denies Meeting With Western Diplomats in Libya

The Spokesman for the US Department of State, Ned Price denied reports that Washington was hosting a meeting of Western Envoys to Libya, on Friday.

He claimed that these reports “are not accurate, and erroneous.” He added that the US is looking forward to hosting a future discussion, “but we haven’t confirmed any dates at this time.”

“We take part in periodic consultations with key international stakeholders on how best to support the special representative of the Secretary-General, SRSG Bathily, in setting the stage for elections in Libya, and supporting the people of Libya,” he said.

Price pointed out that Washington “continues to be engaged with political leaders in Libya, and international partners on that very way forward in Libya. That includes a political track to establish a timeframe for elections as quickly as possible.”

“We strongly support the special representative of the Secretary-General, the call for national consensus in Libya on establishing a clear timeline for elections. We believe there is no other way to secure stability and long-term peace,” Price added.

He stressed that the US “shared the desire of all Libyans to see Libyan leaders adopt the necessary measures as quickly as possible, to set the electoral process in motion.”

Price refused to comment on the recent visit of the Director of the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), William Burns to Libya.

Notably, The Guardian reported that the Special Envoys from the US, France, Germany, Italy, and the UK are due to meet in Washington on Friday, to discuss their next steps, after Libya’s Parliament, and High Council of State (HCS) failed to reach a final agreement in Cairo on the constitutional basis for national elections.

The Guardian claimed that the meeting will look at how to organise elections, and whether to urge the new UN Special Envoy, Abdoulaye Bathily to set a deadline for establishing a national body, to agree on elections.